That’s It. We’re Done.

So now BOTH chambers of Congress have passed a resolution praising the patriotism Gen. David Petraeus, the commander of U.S. forces in Iraq, and condemning a MoveOn.org ad that referred to Petraeus as “General Betray Us.”

I wish I was joking. The resolutions passed with a huge number of Democrats voting in favor, too — despite past Ads from Right-Wing groups that directly attacked the patriotism of Senators John Kerry (remember the “Swift Boat” ads, you brain-dead motherfuckers?) and Max Cleland (who lost both legs and an arm in Vietnam, but was still portrayed as unpatriotic and “soft on terror” by folks like Ann Coulter). No official statements of outrage in those cases, but a single ad from a liberal group, saying that Petraeus was going to present skewed facts (which, it turned out, he did)…

…And our “elected representatives” enact resolutions condemning the constitutionally protected expression of private citizens.

7 Replies to “That’s It. We’re Done.”

  1. Dude pulled out McCarthy in DEFENSE of this amendment!

    Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, I want to urge support for this motion. As those in this House who know me well understand, I come from the State of Joe McCarthy. And one of the reasons that I changed political parties, because I grew up in a Republican family, is because I saw what the local McCarthy supporters did to the best teacher I ever had when they impugned his patriotism by calling him a Bolshevik back during the McCarthy heyday. And to this day there is nothing that gets my dander up more than to have someone’s patriotism questioned on this House floor or anywhere else in the political realm. And if I’m going to get upset when that kind of juvenile activity occurs on the part of the political right, then I’ve got an obligation to be equally upset when that kind of juvenile debate emanates from the left.

    It seems to me that we all ought to recognize that we can have honest and profound differences with the policy that the general was selling 2 weeks ago without getting personal about it. I think what we ought to do is accept this motion, vote for it, send the continuing resolution to the Senate and get on with the business of negotiating out the content of these appropriation bills so that we can do our duty to the country.

    But I’m bolding the last part because I agree with it. However, you don’t “condemn in the strongest possible terms” if that’s the point you want to make!

  2. I don’t even agree with the bolded part, though. WE’RE BEING LIED TO. How do you criticize a lie, without “getting personal” and calling a liar a liar?

    The hypocrisy is astounding. Bush and the Republicans injected a military man into politics, and hid behind his medals, and then have the nerve to get all huffy when he becomes the focus of political statements? Ridiculous.

    But the SUV-driving, 5-dollar-cup-of-coffee-swilling, Walmart-shopping Sheep of this country will come away from this with “FAR-LEFT LOONIES” as the message, rather than the truth of the fact that his report WAS a lie.

  3. I was thinking more of the “Betray Us” name calling, which I’m on the fence about because they posed it as a question and doesn’t read as a personal attack, but the rest of their message I fully support.

    Another note: I just contacted my representative. You might already do this, but I’ll post some easy info for anyone else who might be interested.

    C-Span has a really awesome system set up. You go to the CSPAN Congress Guide where you can look up the voting record of anyone since 1991. And they seem to update at least the day after a vote, maybe even sooner. You can look up and get floor transcripts (which is where I got the above quote) or click on your state and find which way your rep voted (which you can put in your Zip Code on Take Action! to find out, if you’re not sure). And you can send them an email (which a lot of places provide) or what I think is cool, print it out as a letter to mail (which is much more likely to make an impact, and actually be read).

    It can actually be tricky to find the vote, since the titles, especially for amendments like this, don’t match what you’d expect, and the search feature doesn’t seem to always work out. Anyway, for this issue in particular, the vote went down in Roll Call 910. So you can see who voted how. California did pretty well, although just over half still voted for it, including my rep, so I’m pretty pissed off about that.

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